Dalaman Area

Holiday hotspot

Slicing into Turkey’s south west coast, the Dalaman area has been attracting visitors since ancient times. Back then, it was the destination of choice for Greek gods like Pegasus and Apollo. Today, the area pulls in more than 2 million tourists a year.

The turquoise coast

The region’s appeal begins with its beaches. Known as the Turquoise Coast, the Dalaman area’s shoreline is a chain of coves, bays and long stretches of sand. Icmeler and Olu Deniz are bumper beach resorts. Their beaches are accessorised with bars, restaurants, shops and watersports. The famous Blue Lagoon in Olu Deniz, meanwhile, is such a sight for sore eyes, it’s been turned into a national park. Then there’s Sarigerme, a relative newcomer to Turkey’s tourism market, and the proud parent of a 12-kilometre beach.

Ephesus

The Dalaman area’s coast is just the tip of the iceberg. The region’s mountainous backbone is encrusted with traditional hamlets that can be explored on 4x4 safaris. The Dalaman area is also within day-tripping distance of historical sites like Ephesus which, in its glory days, was the second-biggest city in the Roman Empire.

Marmaris

Marmaris is one of the big names in the Dalaman area. The centrepiece of this town is a colourful bazaar. Here, stallholders tout loudly, shisha smoke curls through the air like calligraphy, and shoppers haggle to buy replica designer handbags for the price of a London latte.

Places To Stay In Dalaman Area View all places to stay »

Kalkan

Kalkan, on Turkey’s southwestern coast, used to be a fishing village but now it’s a very cosmopolitan seaside town. Its long promenade is brimming with chic bars and seafood restaurants. Meanwhile, the traditional old town comes with whitewashed houses cascading with bougainvillea, not to mention tucked-away eateries and late-night shops. And you’re in a great spot for some historic sights close by.

Dalyan

Dalyan is a traditional fishing village on the southwest corner of Turkey’s Mediterranean coast. It’s in an idyllic setting, surrounded by citrus fields and pine-clad hills and with a river running through it down to the sea. It’s not just a beauty spot, though – there are fantastic waterfront restaurants overlooking cliffside tombs, lots of upbeat bars and a lively market, too.

Marmaris

Marmaris is larger than your average resort, so it’s not surprising it has so much to offer. Set on Turkey’s Turquoise Coast, it’s got a smart marina and a charming old town with a historic castle, as well as all the modern restaurants, bars and lively clubs you’d expect. And, conveniently, the place also comes with a beach that lounges along the whole length of the resort.

Olu Deniz

Once a hideaway for pirates and smugglers, Olu Deniz – on Turkey’s southwest coast – doesn’t bury its treasures anymore. The Blue Lagoon here is probably the country’s most photographed tourist attraction, and it regularly tops polls of the world’s best beaches.

Hisaronu (Fethiye)

Wind back to 1990 and Hisaronu, nestled inland on Turkey’s southwest coast, was a quiet village. It began to develop as an overspill of nearby Olu Deniz, and is now a bustling destination in its own right. It’s full of bars and clubs that keep things pumping through the night, and it’s just a short dolmus ride from some of Turkey’s most jaw-dropping beaches.

Kalkan

Kalkan, on Turkey’s southwestern coast, used to be a fishing village but now it’s a very cosmopolitan seaside town. Its long promenade is brimming with chic bars and seafood restaurants. Meanwhile, the traditional old town comes with whitewashed houses cascading with bougainvillea, not to mention tucked-away eateries and late-night shops. And you’re in a great spot for some historic sights close by.

Atakoy

If you’re after peace and quiet, Atakoy is the stop to get off at. It’s just 34 kilometres north of Marmaris, but seems like a world away. This is Turkey at its most rustic. Everywhere you turn you’ll see hills and silvery olive groves. And around each corner is the scent of pines and orange trees. In the tiny village centre, a handful of tavernas, a bakery, mini market and grocers serve a population of just 700.

Dalyan

Dalyan is a traditional fishing village on the southwest corner of Turkey’s Mediterranean coast. It’s in an idyllic setting, surrounded by citrus fields and pine-clad hills and with a river running through it down to the sea. It’s not just a beauty spot, though – there are fantastic waterfront restaurants overlooking cliffside tombs, lots of upbeat bars and a lively market, too.

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Top 5 resorts in Dalaman Area

Top 5 hotels in Dalaman Area

Top 5 villas in Dalaman Area

Prices displayed in the 'top places to stay' section are the lowest prices available departing within the next 365 days. All offers are subject to very limited availability.

All prices shown are updated once every morning and therefore could change at any time during the day. All prices shown are per person and are based on 2 adults sharing unless otherwise stated. When selecting an offer you will be asked to enter in the number of adults and children travelling, the applicable price will then be displayed based on your chosen party size.

All offers are subject to availability. Thomson reserves the right to withdraw these offers at any time and without notice. For full booking terms and conditions please click here

Save up to £400 per couple on September & October holidays – Saving offer applies to new bookings only on selected Thomson package holidays booked on thomson.co.uk. Offer applies to holidays departing between 01 September & 31 October 2014 and is subject to limited availability. Savings is against brochure price. Excludes flight only, accommodation only and any other booking type. Additional supplements may apply. Saving is based on a minimum of 2 adults travelling. Thomson reserves the right to withdraw or change this offer at any time.