Majorca

King of the Balearics

The biggest of the Balearics, Majorca has long been a favourite with the world’s travel pack. It’s got extremely good looks on its side, after all. We’re talking tiny inlets, sweeping bays and sandy coves, all lapped by turquoise waters. And away from the coast, it’s a case of sweet-smelling pine forests, hidden hamlets and jagged mountain peaks.

Popular resorts

Resort-wise, families flock to the safe shores of Alcudia, Puerto Pollensa and Cala Bona, which are brimming with restaurants, shops and cafés. Ca’n Picafort is another favourite. This former fishing village has got a 13-kilometre ribbon of sand to its name. Sa Coma, meanwhile, is great for couples thanks to its tree-lined prom and romantic eateries.

Lively nightlife

Things get lively over on the island’s west coast, with the peppy trio of Palma, Palma Nova and Magaluf leading the way with their neon-lit bars and bass-pumping clubs. Majorca’s boutique-brimming, tapas-loving capital city draws a cosmopolitan cocktail crowd, too.

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Felanitx

The town of Felanitx is tucked away in Majorca’s south-east corner, about 14 kilometres from the coast. If you’re after a taste of authentic Majorca, you’re on to a winner here – this place has traditional charm in spades. Back in the day, it was famous for its wine and brandy – in fact, there are still a few wineries and bodegas close by where you can try some of the local tipples.

Alcudia

Set on Majorca’s north-east coast, Alcudia comes as a 2-parter. Inland there’s a historic old town, where shops and cafés fill the streets behind the city walls. And then there’s the coast. Here, the long stretch comes with hotels, bars and a marina backed by restaurants – plus 7 kilometres of sand.

Cala Bona

Set on Majorca’s east coast, Cala Bona is a relaxed fishing town that comes with plenty of rustic charm. Fishermen bring in the day’s catch at the harbour ready for lunch at the waterfront restaurants, while the original winding streets are ripe for exploring. There’s also a pedestrianised modern centre with shops and bars, and a choice of little sandy beaches.

Palma Nova

Palma Nova, on Majorca’s southwest coast, is Magaluf’s quieter, family-friendly neighbour. The place is purpose-built around a trio of white sand beaches. And with friendly bars and restaurants packing the promenade, and the island’s capital, Palma, just 15 kilometres away, there’s plenty to keep you busy away from the sands, too.

Felanitx

The town of Felanitx is tucked away in Majorca’s south-east corner, about 14 kilometres from the coast. If you’re after a taste of authentic Majorca, you’re on to a winner here – this place has traditional charm in spades. Back in the day, it was famous for its wine and brandy – in fact, there are still a few wineries and bodegas close by where you can try some of the local tipples.

Pollensa

Pollensa is tucked away on the northern tip of Majorca, giving some fantastic mountain and sea views. The place does a really good job of mixing the traditional, cosmopolitan and historic here – as you’ll see from the art galleries and Spanish restaurants that mingle with Roman and Medieval ruins. As for a beach, you’ll find a rather lovely one 10 minutes down the road in Puerto Pollensa.

Santa Margalida

Compared to its neighbours 10 kilometres away on Majorca’s north-east coast, Santa Margalida delivers a lite type of tourism. Agriculture and handicrafts are still the focus of this traditional town. And the handful of cafés and restaurants in the main square serve local dishes rather than international cuisine.

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Top 5 resorts in Majorca

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