Lanzarote

First-class beaches

Lanzarote has been in the business of sun, sea and sand breaks since the Seventies. In fact, as one of Europe’s first mainstream holiday destinations, it helped to invent the classic beach break. Take one look at the place and you’ll see what made it the perfect prototype. The main resorts of Puerto del Carmen, Playa de los Pocillos, Costa Teguise and Playa Blanca are hemmed by long ribbons of sand, and their shores are top spots for watersports.

Lunar landscapes

Away from the coast, Lanzarote’s landscape is unique. In fact, UNESCO has given the island World Biosphere Reserve status, in order to protect it. Stand among the silver mountain peaks and black rock formations in the island’s interior and you’d be forgiven for thinking you were on the surface of the moon. The landscape in Timanfaya National Park deserves a special mention. It’s pockmarked by the craters of more than a hundred volcanoes, known as the Fire Mountains.

The legacy of Cesar Manrique

You can’t visit Lanzarote without seeing at least one art installation by the famous artist, Cesar Manrique. The island is covered with his off-the-wall creations. Head to the Jameos del Agua, on the north coast, to explore the underground caves he converted into a chic bar and a concert hall.

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Puerto del Carmen

Puerto del Carmen is on the southeast side of Lanzarote. It first got going in the Sixties and since then it’s upped the tempo from its fishing village roots to become a very lively holiday hub. The waterside promenade doubles up as the main strip – it’s packed with bars, clubs and restaurants, and it also looks out over a trio of beaches. You still get a bit of Puerto del Carmen’s former charm, though, as you’ll see from the authentic eating places in the old town.

Costa Teguise

Back when it was built in the Seventies, Costa Teguise – on Lanzarote’s southeast coast – attracted affluent Spanish families, and today King Carlos of Spain has a place here. But thankfully visitors don’t have to wait for royal appointment to enjoy the sandy beaches, top-class windsurfing and the buzzy but family-focused nightlife.

Playa Blanca

Playa Blanca is backed by volcanic mountains on the southwest tip of Lanzarote. It’s one of the island’s biggest resorts but it’s still quietly sophisticated. The smart marina covers cocktails, upscale dining and boutiques, while the promenade is lined with excellent seafood places. Meanwhile, livelier karaoke and disco bars can be found in the shopping centres. And on top of this, there are 3 different beaches to mess about on.

Puerto del Carmen

Puerto del Carmen is on the southeast side of Lanzarote. It first got going in the Sixties and since then it’s upped the tempo from its fishing village roots to become a very lively holiday hub. The waterside promenade doubles up as the main strip – it’s packed with bars, clubs and restaurants, and it also looks out over a trio of beaches. You still get a bit of Puerto del Carmen’s former charm, though, as you’ll see from the authentic eating places in the old town.

Costa Teguise

Back when it was built in the Seventies, Costa Teguise – on Lanzarote’s southeast coast – attracted affluent Spanish families, and today King Carlos of Spain has a place here. But thankfully visitors don’t have to wait for royal appointment to enjoy the sandy beaches, top-class windsurfing and the buzzy but family-focused nightlife.

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